Knowing Good and Evil

When wisdom enters your heart, and knowledge is pleasant to your soul, discretion will preserve you, understanding will keep you to deliver you from the way of evil, from the man who speaks perverse things.       – Proverbs 2

To be viewed as logically consistent, the modern-atheist must declare there’s no such thing as evil, and by default there’s also no such thing as good.

How perilously low mankind has fallen to boldly and unashamedly make such a lying and wicked declaration.

Having read the latest regurgitation of atheist philosophy  – which is to deny the existence of evil, then to quickly move on to give their own definition of evil; the massive irony of the critical lesson of partaking of the tree of knowledge of good and evil  is obviously lost on those who need it most.

First, there is a huge difference between the words suffering and evil. Trying to interchange and comingle the definitions of both words can only be seen as a deliberate endeavor to mask an already weak and faulty argument.

1. Suffering is having no food and having to go hungry for a while.

2. Evil is deliberately withholding food from someone and watching them starve to death.

[See way below for why you’re not obligated to accept my definition of evil.]

And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “Of every tree of the garden you may freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”

But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not surely die.  For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”

Surely, we’re not speaking of physical eyes being opened here, neither are we speaking of the ability to know right and wrong as God had already given Adam the command ‘eat this, not that.’

Deception is always most effective sprinkled with both a bit of truth and a lie.

Clearly, the serpent lied by saying, “you will not surely die.”

How many of us today are falling prey to the outright lies of the serpent, who deliberately contradicts the very word of God.

Anyway, to the matter at hand.

The author, in the comments made an unknowingly insightful comment, which simply read: “It really does matter how we are defining the word “evil” because if two people aren’t agreeing on the definition, it’s terribly difficult to agree on which acts should be thrown in the category.”

Yes mam’ I agree with you here. You’ve summed up your and many other’s conundrum nicely, thank you.

Isn’t this exactly what the Creator tried to get across to Adam?

What exactly do you think will happen when man takes it upon himself to determine or to define what is good and what is evil. What type of world do we get.

I do not accept your definition of evil, and you do not accept mine… pray tell, which one of us is right,… or even more right?  and who is distinguished enough in this universe to get to decide who is right?

Who ultimately gets to define what is acceptably good and what is unacceptably evil?

Yes, godless ones,

Who made you God?… or worse yet, who have you decided to make into a God?

 

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3 thoughts on “Knowing Good and Evil”

  1. People intentionally do bad things to each other. You may call it evil, and I may call it a psychological failure– but I am sure we both look just as unfavorably upon the action. We both see these actions as completely real and devastating. Are we arguing about the action, or the word itself? Because one seems more important than the other, don’t you think?

    So what happens when we forget the word and talk about the action it represents? What we find is that the only difference between us is how we define the source of that action. You see supernatural elements at work– and I do not. Why? Because you believe in God and I don’t. It’s not complex.

    Also, suffering and cruelty are very real. Supernatural evil is not. They are not interchangeable to me. So if you are directing that whole “suffering and evil are not interchangeable” idea toward me, you have misunderstood my point entirely.

    Look. You can’t go around declaring that without evil there can be no good, base it solely on your specific supernatural definitions, and call it solved. Why bother engaging at all? Good actions are just as real as cruel actions. I do not subscribe to the idea that there is a supernatural version of these events, and somehow “good” continues to exist in my life. Why wouldn’t it? It isn’t supernatural, either.

    In a world without God, good and cruel behaviors make sense to me for reasons that have nothing to do with the spiritual realm. It doesn’t make sense to you because you cannot imagine a world without God. That’s fine. But sometimes I feel as if Christians are constantly making the argument, “Nope– that doesn’t make sense with the idea of God so you are wrong.”

    If only you could put yourself in my shoes long enough to hear how silly that sounds.

    1. Since the word, which is a single, distinct, meaningful element of speech describes the action, it logically concludes we’re arguing both.
      If I’m speaking of running but use the word and meaning of walking instead; either I’m misinformed or I’m trying to confuse others by misinformation.
      [Aside: this is how the Babylonian system works my friend. It changes or at least tries to change the meaning of things, the eventual outcome of which is nothing but confusion.]

      My post made it clear it’s not you nor I who get to determine whether an action is “evil”/”a psychological failure(in your case)”. There are people who intentionally do bad things to others who do not regard their actions as “evil”/”a psychological failure (iyc)”…

      Should I also conclude that when a person does good or something positive that’s also “a psychological failure”… after all, they’re both actions committed by the individual… who gets to decide whether the action is “a psychological failure” or not.

      LAD: the only difference between us is how we define the source of that action.
      Perhaps.
      For me, the source of all evil is the human heart. It’s the action that’s evil… and no person alive can perform an action without first thinking about it!
      Bottom line – it’s thoughts that produces actions. Nothing more. nothing less.

      LAD: You see supernatural elements at work…
      You’re absolutely wrong here!
      I don’t see supernatural elements at work. As stated above, evil must first be conceived in a person’s heart (read: thoughts) before it can manifest into an action. So, the devil made me do it theory doesn’t fly with me.

    2. LAD:”You can’t go around declaring that without evil there can be no good, base it solely on your specific supernatural definitions, and call it solved.”

      It seems you’re projecting quite a bit here.
      The reality is, I have not given a “supernatural definition” of evil nor good. I’ve given my example of what I consider evil to be, and specifically stated ‘you & by extension, anyone else is not obligated to accept my definition.’
      You see, this is the reality of what happens when we assign our own meaning/definition to words.

      This is what’s simple, and it’s not based upon “supernatural definitions”… it’s based on simple logic. If something is determined to be good, then it logically follows that the one making the determination must have knowledge of the alternative in order to make such a claim.
      How do you determine something is a failure if you do not know what success is.
      How do you turn to the right if you don’t know where the left is.

      “LAD: In a world without God, good and cruel behaviors make sense to me for reasons that have nothing to do with the spiritual realm. It doesn’t make sense to you because you cannot imagine a world without God. That’s fine.”
      The problem is you haven’t shown how good & cruel behaviors make sense in a godless world. Yes, you’ve said it makes sense… you haven’t shown how it makes sense.

      I’ve already said ‘good & cruel behaviors’ are based on the choices an individual makes. The behavior is a result of their thought processes, (not God, not the devil) so referencing the ‘spiritual realm’ here is meaningless for me.

      LAD: “But sometimes I feel as if Christians are constantly making the argument, “Nope– that doesn’t make sense with the idea of God so you are wrong.””

      Some may make that argument, and it’s a valid one when taken to its logical conclusions.
      My issue is, the atheist makes their argument deliberately to exclude God [that’s their prerogative]; but when shown the shortcomings of their arguments, some become bitter and make even more confusing and illogical arguments.

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